THIS BALL-BUST’N DISEASE CAN STRIKE WITHOUT NOTICE, AND IS THE #1 CANCER FOR MEN AGED 15-35


THE CAUSE OF TESTICULAR CANCER IS STILL UNKNOWN. THIS IS NOT YOUR FAULT!

sTATISTICS

  •  1 in 250 males will be diagnosed with testicular cancer in their lifetime (US statistic)
  • The survival rate is about 99% for men that show no signs of the cancer having spread.
  • For men with cancer that has spread to the back of the abdomen in the lymph nodes (Stage 2), the survival rate is about 96%. (Canadian statistic)
  • For patients with more widely spread cancer (e.g. to the lungs, liver, bones), the survival rate is about 73%. When the cancer has spread, patients are divided into three categories depending on the sites affected and blood tumor markers. The categories are:
    • Good risk – five-year overall survival = 94% 
    • Intermediate risk – five-year survival = 83%
    • Poor-risk – five-year survival = 71%
  • An estimated 1,050 Canadian males were diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2015
  • 90% of all testicular cancers are primary (develop in germ line cells), the other 10% of cases are secondary. Secondary testicular cancer are cancers that have originated in the testicles and have spread to other regions of the body, lymph nodes, lungs, heart, brain etc. 

rISK fACTORS

  • Age: Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in Men between 15 to 35.
  • Family history: A man with a close male relative who has had testicular cancer has an increased risk of developing testicular cancer.
  • Personal history: Men who have had cancer in one testicle have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer in the other testicle.
  • Cryptorchidism: This is a condition where one or both testicles do not descend into the scrotum before birth as they typically should. The impact of this condition may be lowered if surgery is performed to correct this before puberty.
  • Klinefelter’s Syndrome: Men with this condition have an extra X chromosome, which results in low levels of male hormones, infertility, breast enlargement and small testicles. In rare cases, it also increases the risk of developing germ cell tumors (seminoma) that begin in the chest.
  • HIV (Human Immunodeficiency virus) infection: Men with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), have a slightly higher risk of developing germ cell tumors (seminoma).
  • Down syndrome (Trisomy 21): Men with Down syndrome have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer.